The Big Announcement Now is The Time

IMG_20150819_034403

  • Whether you think you can or think you can’t you’re right.

  • Hello and much love to the music family I have grown up with for over 6 years. This blog post is to recognize the changes that will happen to our social and economic structures in the next decade and beyond. There will be many revolutions and it is up to you to dig your well for your family before you are thirsty. My girlfriend and I qualified to be mentor in developing a debt free cash flow asset which pays us residual income for the rest of our lives so that we can  have complete control of time and money and be free to befull time husband and wifefull time parents andfull time servers to all. We have established incredible relationships with our mentors who have already successfully attained those goals for their families within 5 yearspart time. If you are looking for something better in your life this is the best association in the world which can you lead you to any dream you can imagine. For more info or to connect with us at any point go to http://www.ohanaunited.wwdb.biz or click the link below

Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

Are you an Artist or an Entrepreneur?

Artist_Entreprenuer1

The fact is the biggest artists in the industry are entrepreneurs; Jay-Z, P. Diddy, Lady Gaga, Taylor Swift, Eminem, Dr. Dre, Kenny Chesney, and many more viewed there music career as a Big business opportunity. It is your responsibility to get that same type of vision for your music, you are an entrepreneur and you are the product that you will turn into a multi-million dollar company.

Your first step as an entrepreneur is to understand the concept between employment, small business, and Big business entrepreneurial ventures. An employee exchanges dollars for hours and values security. A small business owner employs people and values independence but stops making income if they stop working (ie doctor, lawyer, sales, etc.). However, a Big business has 500 or more employees and is a money making system which is self-sustained (ie McDonalds, Hamburger University, and Sysco). So, how does this big business mentality relate to our music careers? Think of cover shows as the revenue you receive as an employee in the music industry; maybe it is not exactly your ultimate goal but it helps keeps the lights on. Your original music is the small business, every time you have ever sold a ticket or album that was revenue for “YOUR MUSIC” Incorporated. However, if you stop directly selling and promoting your revenue for that small business would cease. The Big business owners are like the Dr Dre’s of the world that created legacy money which they pass down to generations. Many said that his Audio company had no place, and yet, within a decade he was able to leverage his brand equity as an artists to net almost 1 Billion in personal cash from the sale of that company. Lady Gaga has her Monster perfume, Eminem has Shady Records, Taylor Swift makes insane revenue on all of her merch, but why do you think that is? All of these people figured out there story and differentiator in the music industry and then monetized the brand they created around that story.beats-family

So, remember, all great artists in the industry viewed there music career as a big business from day 1. You must do the same. Viewing yourself as a big business there are a few core elements you must be clear on before you really can grow to the extent you envision in the industry. First, what is the name of your music project? Next, what makes your music and story unique? What is your competitive advantage? What is your 6 month, 12 month, and 24 month plans for growth? What are your goals (ie bring a message to the world, create music full-time, have a passive income from music which pays all my bills, write 200 songs this year, perform 100 shows, bring your message to the world)? What is the long term vision for your music? How will your name and brand communicate that vision? What is your break-even and what will it cost to scale (grow) the business? A good place to start is to answer these questions and perpetually go back to these questions to make sure you are continually aligning yourself with that vision. Once you know the finances, marketing, and plan for growth for your music the sky is the limit in growing your empire. Plus it is a million times easier to ask these hard questions of yourself and your music now then it is to try to change and readjust course with a band name or logo which wasn’t a true reflection of the vision or sound of your music. Trust, this stuff is crucial and it’s what the big wigs at Universal and Sony are looking for to get involved with independent acts. Much love fam!

What Musicians Can Learn from Ray Kroc

raykrocbust

Do you know who Ray Kroc is? Do you know what McDonald is?

Ray Kroc is the business genius who bought the McDonalds franchise from the McDonalds brother and developed his empire from the systematic burger assembly line. Yet, they didn’t invent burgers so what is it about Ray Kroc and McDonald’s that made this burger joint so special? It was a simple system of duplication of business owners.

Once Ray Kroc owned the rights to McDonalds he began franchising other locations and training all the owners how It a while but once he was set up he created a system to serve the masses and he did. At first he was still in the small business category because he was having to go around training all the business owners in order for the training to be consistent. So, he created Hamburger University for new Franchise Owners to get consistent training independent of Kroc. Yet, once all the training was consistent and it started to go national, all the different meats and supplies had no consistency which hurt the brands equity. So, crafty Kroc partnered with Sysco to be the sole supplier for all McDonald’s products.  Today, McDonalds grew Sysco to massive proportions and McDonald’s has over 35,000 locations worldwide and the Kroc family now have Legacy money, money that will never go away, that will grow in perpetuity, and that is passed from generation to generation. Below is a chart which shows Kroc’s franchise model.

raykroc

So what can we learn from Ray Kroc as musicians? It is very simple. It doesn’t matter whether offering burgers or music Ray Kroc taught the world how to make a big business which can truly free you from your 9 to 5. It is our job in our music careers to utilize these big business concepts of systematization, duplication through business owners, partnerships with a larger supplier, and the value of consistent training. Systematization creates profitability and quick growth. Partnerships and duplication from mentoring others results in multiplication of your efforts. Many hands make easy work.

Understand that as a musician in the 21st Century you must where all hats and in reality you are trying to build a big business with over 500 employees from your music. Understand that the first people you are privately franchising your career to is your band members, producers, managers, and initial fans. These are the advocates that will help you build a network of people enjoying your music and your story. The more systematic way you can find to mentor these people in growing your organization the quicker the idea of your music can manifest into cash. Think of the biggest in the industry right now, Drake (singer who raps), Taylor Swift (Pop Singer with a hint of country), Lady Gaga (Lil Monster Revolution), and Iggy Azalea (Very Fancy); all of the largest artists and bands built an entire big business and brand around their music. They found a need they were satisfying with their story and then everything about their marketing, crew, product lines, all center around that concept and through duplication they created an organization that can run independently. Do you think Dr Dre wakes up in hot sweats wondering if the new Yelawolf song is going to hit numbers? NO! Dr Dre has duplicated himself through other artists, producers, business owners, and product lines so that he makes Legacy money, money that you make in your sleep, money that you can pass down to your kids, and money that can give you the freedom to just live out your dreams in music. Looking forward to feedback, Much love music fam! FREEDOM!

Why I live the Music Industry Life Jon-K Poet

jonkhd

My name is Jon Kowalsky, I am the founder and HBO Youth Poet who know performs as Jon-K Poet. During the summer I was 17 I spent 3 weeks in Austin, Texas and it changed the trajectory of my life from being an Engineer. In Austin, I saw the joy and culture and family and beauty that can flower around a city which nurtures art, music, and entertainment. I met a lot of music entrepreneurs who were living the dream and had true holistic success because they had control of time and money. My place in the music industry was forever crystalized on July 4th, 2007.

My roommate and I in Austin went to the Unity Tour with Matisyahu and 311. I was a huge fan of Matisyahu and although I knew his music was incredible I was nervous whether or not my conservative Christian roommate would be able to receive and enjoy the music from this Hasidic Jew. That night, I will never forget my friend and I both singing the lyrics to “King Without A Crown” together. I remember being amazed at how hardline in his beliefs he could be if you spoke to him and yet music gave him the ability to elevate above the words singing praise to Adonai because music is able to communicate love regardless of race, religion, creed, or sexual preference. I saw that that night in Austin. From then on I knew I wanted nothing more in life than to be a successful Music Entrepreneur.

On the way home, I was still thinking about independence and music and changing the world when literally 100’s of Fireworks all started going off in the distance in all directions; every firework like the burst of hope music provides in a world which can sometimes seem so dark. Music has the power to be transcendent: it makes you bigger than yourself, it allows you to transcend your current circumstances, it allows you to give hope and help people you may never meet or be alive to see how you’ve helped, and gives some eternal life by transcending time and space to become true Legends who live forever in their art.  That is why I do the music industry.

Stay tuned for our big announcement this month.

Rockin’ Out with PepperDome and Chatting About What Works For Them

Image

PepperDome interview – with John, Eric and Vattel

What is the name of your band and how many members do you have?

John: The name of the band is PepperDome and currently there are three members of the band, a drummer that does vocals, a bassist that does vocals and a guitarist that does vocals.

Where are you from?

We are based out of Mebane, NC.

In what genre would you classify yourselves?

Basically we’re a hard rock band, but we’ve got versions of progressive, punk, indie, and alternative influences that come through.

Has it evolved over time or was there a certain sound that you liked and had initially when you started?

It evolved, I guess, because Vattel has a jazz background, Eric is little bit more of a heavy metal guy. I’m a little all over the map, I listen to everything and anything, but I think that’s what makes the music what it is.

What is the collaboration process?

Eric: We kind of tried a couple of different writing styles but right now seems like the one we’re most comfortable with is we’re working on a batch of 3 songs, that is Vattelbrings in something that he’s written and we’ll basically explore that and then I’ll bring in something, we’ll explore that and John will also bring in something.  We’re definitely all involved in writing, but it usually starts with one of us having a core idea, whether it be a riff, a drum beat,  or a metal beat, and we work off that.

Do you ever find it difficult having equal collaboration and contribution?

Vattel, bass player: This situation is one of the most open ones I’ve been in.  Each of us have an idea and if we all band our heads together and make it grow. We all invest in each other’s ideas.  It’s not like I’m more protective of my idea than I would be of John’s idea, or Eric’s idea or PepperDome’s idea. It doesn’t matter who brought in the idea, we’re all more concerned about the end result of what a song is going to be and wanting it to reach its full potential.

John: Basically we have a high level of respect for each other so we understand that as we’re working, if a song or something is not working correctly that we can step up and say wait a minute, something’s wrong here, we have to do something and we will sit down and reevaluate what we’re doing.   Moreso than just saying it’s wrong and there’d be a big battle.  It’s all about the music and what we want to do and again, the end result is the most important part.

Have you toured outside of your area?

For the past year we have been playing shows and touring around probably within an hour and a half radius of where we are based.  Just a few weeks ago we did have the opportunity to head to Tennessee and play in Knoxville and Nashville, but after this album is finished we plan on broadening our horizons and moving out much further–maybe making short weekend tours and try to get out further than the radius we’ve done so far.

How do go about organizing your tours?

Eric: John did most of the legwork regarding the electronic press kits that we send the venues. We’ll e-mail them, send them a press kit.  We’ll have a song and then a lot of press on websites, Facebook, Myspace, Reverbnation. They can review from there and decide if we fit their club or venue or not.  And we’ve also had other bands ask us to play with them.  A lot of networking seems to be very important around this area so that helps a lot too.

You mentioned sending EPKs. What do you include in your press kit?

We have the typical one sheet with the history of the band, we have a couple of pictures, some song samples, a video sample, and there’s actually some interviews and a couple of reviews.

How do you develop your songs?

Vattel: We’ve tried a few different approaches.  We’ve tried starting with a riff or some sort of message idea or scheme or Lego, to put blocks together to create a structure.  Normally we go with what works and get a feel for the lyric and sort of slap that together and bang our heads together to come to some accord regarding what the lyrics are trying to express with our instruments.

What’s the best piece of advice your band has been giving since you started playing together?

We’ve been told to keep writing music, keep experiencing playing together and keep moving forward and really try to meet.  Of course practice makes perfect so the more experience you have with each other, the more you feel how each other plays, the more it makes for better conditions and a better band overall.

What inspires your music?

There’s basically two main themes that are in there–a social awareness of the world around you that could be anywhere from just experiencing life all the way up to some song with a political intent to it or a political message and there’s also other songs that are about self-exploration and how to live to be yourself and don’t worry what other people think of you and to have the strength and power to go beyond whatever restrictions are put on you by society.

If you had a megaphone that you could let everyone listen to one message, what would it be for Pepperdome?

I would say just for people to wake up, understand the world they live in and to be themselves.

Do you have any new releases coming up?

Yes, we are currently working on an album as we speak, almost literally.  We are almost done with what we’re calling the first draft of music.  We’re going to have a full length record by the first of next year, so we’re in the process of putting it together.

And that’s your debut album?

It’s actually the fourth CD in the mix.

How do the songs differ from other CDs?

Vattel: The previous three CDs were written by John himself but he played all the instruments.  This will be the first CD that Eric and I will be participating in the writing of the music so it will be more of a band record than a solo project, I guess you would say.

John: Which is bringing the music to a whole new level.  It’s allowed the music to expand to areas where it hasn’t gone before and hopefully that will grab some people’s attention.

What would you like to say to your fans?

John: Thank you. Keep coming out. We love the support.  We love to see you constantly and hope you bring all your friends.

Vattel: Like us on Facebook!

Anything else you’d like to share?

John: The only other thing we can say that hasn’t been covered already is we are actually looking for a fourth member.  We are currently looking to broaden our horizons and we are looking for a lead vocalist.

Listen to PepperDome’s music now at www.Studio120Music.com/PepperDome

And stay connected with PepperDome at http://www.pepperdomeband.com

The ‘Squeeze’ On Music Education

When I was in fifth grade I remember the best days were when we go to either art or music and we got to paint something or play instruments. Those were the moments that really stuck with me; not learning my grammar in English and not memorizing equations. Recently, Michael Blakeslee, the deputy director of the Music Education Conference (MENC) talked about school board’s making hard decisions like ”What if we don’t start band in the fifth grade? What if we wait until the seventh grade?” He goes on to explain that this national lack of music funding, “has a long-term impact on what goes on in schools with music at the undergraduate and graduate level, and our culture as a whole”

Program Manager at VH1’s Save The Music Foundation, Rob Davidson, explains that standardizes testing has had a “squeezing effect” on the funding for music, arts, physical ed, social studies and other subjects that are not tested. This truly touches upon the fear of standardized tests that we teach kids how to be good test takers as oppose to being creative thinkers. It is ironic that the end result we want is a competitive workforce and so we create these standardized tests to measure the progress and then cut funding for music and art programs to teach to the test even though music and arts education has proven to spur the innovative workforce we desire.

Blakeslee went on to conclude, “The current [Obama] administration has said some very nice things, but most actions have not been favorable to music education.” National cutbacks on music should inspire us to localized solution like www.Studio120Music.com to help music programs school to school, district to district, and state to state. But also think locally about how you could help music programs by holding fundraisers, directly donating, or just volunteering as an assistant.

Future of Music After Universal Music Group’s 1.9 Billion Dollar Acquisition of EMI

Universal Music Group’s 1.9 Billion Dollar purchase has officially been completed. After months of deliberations with both European and American fair trade regulators, the deal has been approved. Much of the deliberations involved Universal being required to sell off various assets of EMI so that it was not a de facto monopoly in music. To give you an idea of the magnitude of these asset sales, one of the labels they sold off included acts such as Coldplay. So, now that the dust has settled, is this a good thing for the industry? Over the past few months various music groups have come out against the deal as creating unfair competition in the music industry. I will concede, that usually consolidation of large companies (like Univeral-EMI) result in unfair pricing, unfair competition, and other exploitations as the market leader position. BUT, I’m going to take a different route and be hopeful for the good that could occur.

The acquisition of EMI by Universal will enable both companies to eliminate redundant jobs. This elimination of redundant positions and increase in efficiency will hopefully result in them investing more in artist development and an even broader artist roster. Looking at the labels acquired in the deal it quickly becomes apparent how diverse the music is in this acquisition: Capitol Records, Def Jam Recordings, Capitol Nashville Recordings, Island Recordings, Universal Music Nashville, Virgin Records, Blue Note, EMI Records, Interscope Records, and more.

`               Another notable point made by UMG Chairman and CEO Lucian Grainge is that, “EMI is finally returning to people who have music in their blood.” Since February 2012, EMI had been acquired by dun dun dunnnnn Citigroup. So with this sale going to Universal and Sony acquiring EMI publishing, these music entities are no longer owned by venture capitalist. These entities are now in the hands of people who are actually in the music business. One of the most frustrating things I’ve found in the music industry , whether its live music or labels or any other aspect, is the unscrupulous people who are only in it for the money and not the love of music. It’s good to at least know that people who have made their life in music will now be able to lead the future of EMI, Universal, and the industry.

Long-term, I think it’s hard to say whether this will be a great thing, a bad thing, or have little impact on the industry. But I always like to look toward the horizon with my focus on the great possibilities.